MSc in Humanitarian Practice PgDip/PGCert in Humanitarian Practice Course Handbook 2019

Please Note:

Information relevant to all postgraduate taught programmes in the School of Arts, Languages and Cultures (SALC) can be found in the School Postgraduate Taught Handbook, which should be read and used as a reference in conjunction with this Handbook. The School Handbook is available online here.

1. INTRODUCTION

1.1 LEAP programme

The Leadership Education Academic Partnership (LEAP) programme is delivered jointly by the Humanitarian and Conflict Response Institute (HCRI) at the University of Manchester and the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM) in partnership with Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF). It brings together the disciplines of epidemiology, history, politics, anthropology, development studies, international relations, public health, management and humanitarian medicine, as well as the expertise of academics and leading practitioners. As an HCRI and LSTM student, you will benefit from a comprehensive and interdisciplinary approach to teaching and research, as well as individual tutoring and supervision from academics from a wide range of disciplines

The programme crosses traditional subject boundaries to enable you to reflect critically on issues arising from your own work, the wider humanitarian agenda and develop the skills set needed for contemporary humanitarian practitioners. Focusing on a wide range of humanitarian issues, this course offers a thorough investigation of the agents of change in the humanitarian field. Alongside the expertise of specific course unit conveners, the programme draws on staff from a wide range of disciplines at both institutions and partners with professional experience and insights from different humanitarian organisations, including MSF.

1.2 Academic advisor
Professional students entering the LEAP programme will face a complex online and face to face series of educational sequences that are designed to provide the highest level of interdisciplinary training, while they remain engaged in humanitarian practice. Along the way, there are many decisions to be made and many challenges to be met both in the universities and in their places of work. Collaboration and communication between HCRI, LSTM and MSF is essential.
Academic Advisor (HCRI/LSTM): Each student in the LEAP programme is assigned an academic advisor who is responsible for providing academic supervision during their degree programme. The main role of the academic advisor is to maintain oversight of the student’s academic progress by assisting in the selection of courses; ensuring the student is meeting degree milestones in a timely manner; assessing and developing the student’s interests and abilities; and monitoring student progress in academic coursework, and creating a examination transcripts at the end of the programme of study. The universities will provide an academic advisor for the duration of the study. An academic advisor is mandatory for all pathways. For an MSc student, the dissertation supervisor will be additionally assigned at a later stage upon the student’s selection of their dissertation research topic.

1.3 My Manchester
This handbook should be used in conjunction with resources available in My Manchester

My Manchester brings all your online university services together in one place. From My Manchester you can access the student self-service system which will allow you to view your timetable, select course units and access your grades for assessed work. My Manchester also allows you to access university services including Blackboard and your university library account.

You can login into My Manchester here.

Features include:

  • My Studies – view your Courses, To Do List and Calendar in Blackboard
  • My Library – search the extensive catalogue, book study rooms and see loans and reservations
  • Email – access to your Outlook Live account
  • My Services – see your personalised student record and access key services
  • Future Life – careers advice and opportunities, plus information about further study
  • Student Support – find the help and guidance you need quickly and easily
  • Students’ Union – services and information offered by the SU

For further information on using My Manchester, please see the Crucial Guide.

1.4 Learning Resource
Blackboard: modules (units)and enrolments
The teaching and learning activities within your course programme are enhanced and supported by the use of Blackboard. All of your units/spaces are listed here under the ‘Blackboard’ tab. Courses become available to students one week before the start of teaching.

Here you will find:

  • a list of all the units you are registered to take, under the ‘Course List’,
  • a list for programme spaces or other ‘Organisations’, in the ‘My Communities’ list.

You can also access Blackboard on your smartphone using the Blackboard Mobile Learn app. For guidance, see here.

To ensure that you have access to all of your units within Blackboard, you must be enrolled on them through the Student Records system. Once enrolled, your units should appear in Blackboard within 24 hours. Also, your tutor needs to have ‘activated’ your Blackboard course in order for you to access it. If you cannot see a course you expect to see, please:

  • contact your School Administrator to check that you have been enrolled;
  • check with your tutor that they have made the unit available;

Note: If you change your course enrolments there will also be a delay of up to 24 hours in acquiring your new units and removing those you are no longer taking.

Your Blackboard unit(s) will contain different elements, depending on how your tutor(s) have set them up. They may be used for course materials, lecture handouts, coursework submission, quizzes, additional resources, discussion boards or blogs, for example. If you have any queries about the content, please check with your tutor first.

After enrolment or changing your enrolments, if your units are not correctly listed in Blackboard after 24 hours, please let us know which course(s) you are missing here.

If your unit is assessed by coursework, and the submission of coursework is done online via Turnitin, you can find detailed video guidance here by logging in and searching for ‘Turnitin Induction’

If your tutor delivers feedback on your coursework also online you can also look up the guidance on how to access your feedback ‘A Student Guide to Submitting an Assignment via Turnitin’ here (document) or via a video search for Turnitin Feedback here.

For general information on Blackboard and access to support information, please see here.

The University of Manchester Library and other Libraries

The University of Manchester Library is one of only five National Research Libraries. With more than 4 million printed books and manuscripts, over 41,000 electronic journals and 500,000 electronic books, as well as several hundred databases, the library is one of the best-resourced academic libraries in the country.

The Main Library holds the principal collections that support teaching and research in the humanities, and the social sciences. A number of specialist site libraries also support the humanities and these are located across campus. The Library’s Special Collections, one of the finest collections of manuscripts and early printed books in the UK, are housed in The John Rylands Library, Deansgate in the city centre.

The Alan Gilbert Learning Commons is open every day apart from Christmas Day and Boxing Day and a number of library sites extend their opening times in the run up to exams.

On the Library website there is a wealth of resources on a range of topics from using the printers and borrowing books to booking a PC or accessing resources off campus or making a Group Study Room booking.

The My Learning Essentials skills programme offers online resources, workshops and drop-ins designed to help to develop your academic, wellbeing and employability skills.

 

2. PROGRAMME AIMS AND LEARNING OUTCOMES

2.1 Aims
The LEAP programme has been created to meet the professional and personal development needs of those working in the humanitarian sector, producing graduates who will be expected to meet the increasing demand for humanitarian leadership. The blended nature of this education programme promotes lifelong learning.

The overarching aim of the programme is to enhance the leadership and management capacities in medical humanitarian operations, through employing multidisciplinary, self-reflective, and collaborative approaches and epistemologies and to:

  • nurture graduates who are critical thinkers, effective communicators, innovative problem solvers, lifelong learners and ethical leaders with humanitarian principles;
  • advance interdisciplinary knowledge to meet the changing operational needs of humanitarian fields;
  • lead and excel in professional education, applied research and partnership for the betterment of humanitarian movements.

2.2 Intended Learning Outcomes

A. Knowledge & Understanding
A1. Develop critical insights into competing perspectives on emergency response and humanitarian actions;
A2. Demonstrate the capacity to implement practical knowledge in humanitarian management, including resilience building, leading teams, epidemiology and developing critical reflections of their own role in the humanitarian context;
A3. Critique humanitarian policy and standards, including competency in developing a reasoned argument, critically considering data sources, and defending different approaches;
A4. Synthesize current theories and best practices in the humanitarian sector and be equipped to apply advanced knowledge to influence decision making in humanitarian contexts using a multidisciplinary approach;
A5. Analyse issues related to emergency humanitarianism assistance, including international actions taken by government, intergovernmental, and nongovernmental organisations in response to emergencies of natural and human origins;
A6 Apply techniques of research and inquiry to a relevant research area to establish evidence-based knowledge and practice, evaluate research and professional literature, and comprehend their applications in the humanitarian field.
A7. Conduct innovative projects in research approaches and techniques, including data gathering, collation, analysis, and dissemination of results in humanitarian contexts.
B. Intellectual Skills
B1. The ability to synthesize and evaluate data relating to humanitarian management and practice
B2. Skills in interpreting and evaluating theoretical arguments and empirical evidence relating to humanitarian practice and management.
B3. A critical awareness of different approaches relating to knowledge and research in the area of humanitarian practice
B4. The capacity for independent and self-managed learning
B5. The ability to plan and execute an independent piece of academic research (MSc only)
C. Practical Skills
C1. Conduct bibliographic searches and collect relevant resources
C2. Manipulate and analyze basic quantitative datasets and critically analyze qualitative research
C3. Present information, analysis, argument, and commentary, in a form appropriate to the intended audience
C4. Apply a range of general ideas to the ways in which humanitarian action interventions are organized and undertaken
C5. The ability to apply the above skills in the management of an independent research project related to humanitarian practice
D. Transferable Skills and Personal Qualities
D1. Participate constructively in person and online in teams or groups
D2. Structure and present ideas effectively
D3. Manage time and work to deadlines
D4. Exercise initiative and self-reliance skills, and work independently
D5. Critically evaluate their own role within an organisation/team
D6. Demonstrate IT skills including use of the Internet, word processing, and software packages

 

3. PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND PATHWAYS

3.1 General information

Award Programme Title Total

Credits

Expected

Duration

Extended

Duration

MSc Humanitarian Practice (MScHP) 180 36 months 12-60 months
PgDip Humanitarian Practice (PGDipHP) 120 24 months 9-48 months
PGCert Humanitarian Practice (PGCertHP) 60 12 months 6-24 months

Required core units by programme level

Course unit Credits MSc PG Dip PG Cert
(A) Critical approaches to evidence 15 P P P Students must take any 2 of A, B, C D and E
(B) Critical reflection on practice 15 P P P Students must take any 2 of A, B, C D and E
(C) Critical approaches to management of humanitarian operations 15 P P P Students must take any 2 of A, B, C D and E
(D) Research into Practice 15 P optional optional
(E) History of Humanitarian Aid 15 optional but attendance encouraged optional but attendance encouraged P Students must take any 2 of A, B, C D and E
Dissertation 60 P N/A N./A

3.2 MSc pathway
Minimum 180 credits will be required for the MSc pathway. There are four 15 credit units that form the 4 essential cores (total 60 credits); a wide range of 10-20 credit optional units (total 60 credits); and 60 credits for the MSc dissertation.

Core modules: Prior to the dissertation research, you should undertake the 4 core modules below. In rare circumstances some core modules can be waived, provided you already have equivalent training, but approval is required.

      • Two core units, ‘Critical approaches to management of humanitarian operations’ and ‘Critical reflection on practice’ will focus on humanitarian practice and management expertise in complex operational context. These management modules will be delivered in the September semester.
      • The core unit, ‘Critical approaches to evidence’ provides you with the knowledge and skills in epidemiology and research methods so that you can understand published research papers and then translate and apply the findings to your own practice., ‘Research into practice’ is aresearch practice module to train participants to conduct independent research. In particular, ‘Research into practice’ is designed to prepare students for the research proposal for the MSc dissertation, and is therefore strongly recommended to be undertaken in line with the dissertation research. These two modules will be delivered in the January semester.

 

Optional modules: in addition to the core modules, you can choose any of the optional modules (10-15 credits) to meet the 60 credits requirement of the MSc pathway, including ‘History of humanitarian aid’ which is strongly recommended (but not mandatory) for MSc students. History of humanitarian aid focuses on building a critical understanding of modern humanitarians and complex issues arising from humanitarian movement during times of crisis and conflict.

The MSc pathway structure (180 credits)

Core and optional modules delivery plan

January Semester September Semester
Core modules (all mandatory) *
Critical Approach to Evidence

(led by LSTM, 15 credits)

Critical Approach to Management
(led by HCRI, 15 credits)
Research into Practice
(led by HCRI, 15 credits)
Critical Reflection on Practice
(tentative title, led by LSTM, 15 credits)
Optional Modules
 

J1: Face to Face modules I

(LSTM, 10 credits***)

·       TROP776: Child Nutrition

·       TROP706: Development of a Disease Control Programme

·       TROP900: Health in Humanitarian Emergencies

·       TROP901: Humanitarian Operations: Environmental Health and Logistics

·       TROP976: Health Promotion

·       TROP809: Media, Policy and Advocacy in Humanitarian Action

·       TROP971: Statistical Methods for Epidemiological and Clinical Research

+

J2: Online modules

(HCRI, 15 credits)

·       HCRI 71000: Community Approaches to Health

·       HCRI 72000: Ethics, Human Rights and Health

·       HCRI73000: Disaster and Crisis Management

·       HCRI78000: Research Methods in Global Health

+

J3: Face to Face modules II

(LSTM,   10 credits)

·       TROP974: HIV in Resource Limited Settings TROP915: HR Planning and Management

·       TROP941: Management of Refugee and Displaced Populations

·       TROP708: Organisation and Management

+

J4: Face to Face modules III

(LSTM, 20 credits)

·       TROP807: Complex Humanitarian Emergencies

+

J5: Blended modules

(HCRI, 15 credits)

·       HCRI: History of Humanitarianism

 

S1: Face to Face modules

(HCRI, 15 credits)

·       HCRI62212: Emergency Humanitarian Assistance

 

S2: Online modules

(HCRI, 15 credits)

·       HCRI77000: Risk, Vulnerability and Resilience

·       HCRI75000: Diseases and Trauma in Developing Countries

·       HCRI76000: Management and Leadership in Health and Humanitarianism (winter session*)

·       HCRI74000: Health Systems and Market (winter session)

2-5 weeks study visit 2-3 weeks study visit

*Some core courses can be waived, if students have already equivalent training. Approval for the waive is required.

3.3 PG certificate pathway
Minimum of 60 credits will be required for PG certificate. There are four 15 credit units that form the 4 essential core (specifically designed for MSF) modules. You should choose any 2 (or more) of 4 core modules below:

Critical approaches to management of humanitarian operations

Critical reflection on practice

Critical approaches to evidence

History of Humanitarian Aid’

(Details of these units as above – see MSc pathway)

In addition to the core units, you can choose any of the optional units to meet the 60 credit requirement of the PG certificate pathway.

Core and optional modules delivery plan

January Semester September Semester
Core modules (choose 2 or more)*
Critical Approach to Evidence

(led by LSTM, 15 credits)

Critical Approach to Management
(led by HCRI, 15 credits)
History of Humanitarianism
(led by HCRI, 15 credits)
Critical Reflection on Practice**
(tentative title, led by LSTM, 15 credits)
Optional Modules
 

J1: Face to Face modules I

(LSTM, 10 credits)

·       TROP776: Child Nutrition

·       TROP706: Development of a Disease Control Programme

·       TROP900: Health in Humanitarian Emergencies

·       TROP901: Humanitarian Operations: Environmental Health and Logistics

·       TROP976: Health Promotion

·       TROP809: Media, Policy and Advocacy in Humanitarian Action

·       TROP971: Statistical Methods for Epidemiological and Clinical Research

+

J2: Online modules

(HCRI, 15 credits)

·       HCRI 71000: Community Approaches to Health

·       HCRI 72000: Ethics, Human Rights and Health

·       HCRI73000: Disaster and Crisis Management

·       HCRI78000: Research Methods in Global Health

+

J3: Face to Face modules II***

(LSTM, 10 credits)

·       TROP974: HIV in Resource Limited Settings TROP915: HR Planning and Management

·       TROP941: Management of Refugee and Displaced Populations

·       TROP708: Organisation and Management

+

J4: Face to Face modules III***

(LSTM, 20 credits)

·       TROP807: Complex Humanitarian Emergencies

 

S1: Face to Face modules

(HCRI, 15 credits)

·       HCRI62212: Emergency Humanitarian Assistance

 

S2: Online modules

(HCRI, 15 credits)

·       HCRI77000: Risk, Vulnerability and Resilience

·       HCRI75000: Diseases and Trauma in Developing Countries

·       HCRI76000: Management and Leadership in Health and Humanitarianism (winter session*)

·       HCRI74000: Health Systems and Market (winter session)

2-5 weeks study visit 2-3 weeks study visit

* Student can choose any 2 (or more) of core modules across either or both semesters

** Critical reflection on practice’ (tentative title) will be revised from Enquiry-based humanitarian management.

*** Face to face modules II and III (LSTM) cannot be undertaken together with core modules in January semester, except for longer study visit or two study visits in January semester.

3.4 List of Core Modules
Core modules are all blended learning units which include eight weeks of online learning with two weeks of intensive face to face teaching in the middle of the modules. The teaching and learning methods we use will include:

      • Lectures;
      • Tutorials;
      • Skills workshops (including action learning sets);
      • Individual and group presentations;
      • Group discussion and reporting-back;
      • Group, paired and individual case study analyses and exercises;
      • Assignment and work-based projects;
      • Meetings with mentors;
      • Reflective reports

(A) Critical Approaches to Evidence
This unit aims to equip the humanitarian practitioner with the knowledge and skills to understand, apply and translate evidence so that they can lead the development of innovative evidence-based interventions that will improve wellbeing and relieve suffering of populations affected by humanitarian crises in a global setting. This unit will provide you with the knowledge and understanding to critically examine quantitative and qualitative research paradigms, methods and core concepts appropriate for humanitarian practice. It will provide you with the essential epidemiology you need to understand how evidence can be used to inform and shape policy decisions and the critical knowledge and understanding of the position of evidence in humanitarian practice decision making. You will critically appraise evidence from qualitative and quantitative research papers. You will further develop the skills of synthesis, analysis and interpretation of research findings in order to inform decision making. You will further develop your communication skills so that you can communicate research outcomes effectively, using appropriate technical and lay language to explain risk and patterns of health-related events.

(B) Critical Reflection on Practice
This unit aims to support a reflective approach to enhance humanitarian practice skills, knowledge and competences so that humanitarian practitioners can solve their own operational and organisational challenges in complex emergencies. It will rely on methods of enquiry-based learning to enable students to explore their personal values and beliefs, culture and practices of their own humanitarian action and surrounding environments. Online taught sessions will include plenary lectures by academic staff and humanitarian practitioners as well as online discussions. Face to face taught sessions (1.5 hr seminar + 1 hr lecture) will be interactive seminars which students are expected to prepare for independently using allocated resources. Based on a flipped classroom method, students will lead the critical discussions based on the managemental challenges given by the lecturer. A short lecture will follow at the end of each taught session. Also this unit includes half-day participatory sessions simulating operational and managerial challenges in humanitarian missions. It provides a forum for the exchange of diverse experiences in humanitarian contexts in which audience or group members tell experiences from their practice and watch them enacted on the spot.

(C)Critical approaches to management of humanitarian operations
This unit studies the management and leadership issues faced by managers in humanitarian operation which are characterised by uncertainty and unpredictability. It covers various operational challenges and related academic debates to provide students with an ability to critically engage with their own practices. The course will explore how individuals practice and team processes can be enhanced in complex, fast- evolving and challenging contexts. Central aims of the course unit are

  • To deepen critical understanding of participants in humanitarian principles and operations rooted in complex political, social and cultural factors at regional, national and global level.
  • To strengthen leadership and management capacities in diverse humanitarian challenges and operational dilemmas encountered by students and other medical humanitarian actors

The taught elements are structured with two themes: (1) humanitarian principles and changing context; and (2) humanitarian practice in operational dilemmas. The first theme will be composed of two overview online lectures and seminars for revisiting contemporary and historical humanitarian movement and their operational challenges; and two action learning sets for critically identifying operational challenges encountered by students and their humanitarian peers. The second theme will be composed of five face to face lecturers and management workshops for enhancing critical humanitarian practice in specific operational dilemmas; and two action learning sets for peer to peer consultation.

(D) Research into Practice (core module for MSc pathway only)
This unit aims to prepare humanitarian practitioners with the analytic skills and methods they need to develop a research proposal to address operational challenges, and undertake appropriate research to inform humanitarian practice. In the MSc pathway, it also aims to prepare students for the dissertation or higher-level exploration in this field. Students will learn how to develop an appropriate research question from the humanitarian challenges they have encountered, and develop a proposal for reflective or operational research to evaluate a situation and inform practice. Main aspects of qualitative and quantitative research will be covered with mixed methods appropriate to humanitarian settings. You will be expected to explore problems or issues that are particularly pertinent to their own humanitarian practice. It is encouraged that this proposal should form the basis of their dissertation research. Research into practice is designed as a fully online module that focus on individual interaction of students with their academic and practice advisors, along with their humanitarian peers.

(E) History of Humanitarian Aid (core module for PG certificate pathway only)
This unit will focus on critical understandings of modern humanitarianism and the complex issues faced by the humanitarian sector during times of crisis and conflict. This is an optional core unit for the PG certificate pathway, and will be delivered in the January 2019 semester. This course seeks to undertake a survey of the history of modern humanitarianism as an idea or ‘ideology of compassion’. It will analyse humanitarian organisations in relation to population displacement and other crises, and refugees as recipients and agents of humanitarian aid. The unit will also provide a cultural and social history of non-governmental organisations at key periods from the mid-nineteenth century to the present day.

3.5 List of Optional Modules
Students will select optional courses provided by University of Manchester and / or Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine. MSc students will undertake 60 credits of optional course units. PG diploma students will undertake 60 (if 4 core units are undertaken) or 75 credits (if 3 core units are undertaken). PG certificate students will undertake at least 30 credits of core units (if 2 core units are undertaken).

Semester 2 (Jan-Jun 2019)

Code Course Unit Name Credits Delivered by Delivery

/Length

Undertaken with core courses
SALC61202 The History of Humanitarianism 15 HCRI Blended

10 weeks

Yes
HCRI 71000 Community Approaches to Health 15 HCRI Online

8 weeks

Yes
HCRI 72000 Ethics, Human Rights and Health 15 HCRI Online

8 weeks

Yes
HCRI73000 Disaster and Crisis Management 15 HCRI Online

8 weeks

Yes
HCRI78000 Research Methods in Global Health 15 HCRI Online

8 weeks

Yes
TROP776 Child Nutrition 10 LSTM Face-to-face

2 weeks

Yes
TROP706 Development of a Disease Control Programme 10 LSTM Face-to-face

2 weeks

Yes
TROP900 Health in Humanitarian Emergencies 10 LSTM Face-to-face

2 weeks

Yes
TROP901 Humanitarian Operations: Environmental Health and Logistics 10 LSTM Face-to-face

2 weeks

Yes
TROP976 Health Promotion 10 LSTM Face-to-face

2 weeks

Yes
TROP809 Media, Policy and Advocacy in Humanitarian Action 10 LSTM Face-to-face

2 weeks

Yes
TROP971 Statistical Methods for Epidemiological and Clinical Research 10 LSTM Face-to-face 2 weeks Yes
TROP807 Complex Humanitarian Emergencies 20 LSTM Face-to-face

4 weeks

No*
TROP974 HIV in Resource Limited Settings 10 LSTM Face-to-face

2 weeks

No*
TROP915 HR Planning and Management 10 LSTM Face-to-face

2 weeks

No*
TROP941 Management of Refugee and Displaced Populations 10 LSTM Face-to-face

2 weeks

No*
TROP708 Organisation and Management 10 LSTM Face-to-face 2 weeks No*

*These optional course units cannot be undertaken with core courses within 6 week short visits and need additional or long-term visits; If you want to undertake these courses please contact us before you undertake any core courses.
** If you are taking core units in semester 2 (Jan to June) then there are some of the optional units at LSTM that clash with the online or face to face element of these units, and they cannot be taken at the same time.

Semester 1 (Sep-Dec 2019)

Code Course Unit Name Credits Delivered by Delivery

/Length

Undertaken with core courses
HCRI62212 Emergency Humanitarian Assistance 15 HCRI Blended

8 weeks

Yes
HCRI 77000 Risk, Vulnerability and Resilience 15 HCRI Online

8 weeks

Yes
HCRI75000 Diseases and Trauma in Developing Countries 15 HCRI Online

8 weeks

Yes
HCRI76000 Management and Leadership in Health and Humanitarianism (winter session*) 15 HCRI Online

10 weeks

Yes
HCRI74000 Health Systems and Market (winter session) 15 HCRI Online

10 weeks

Yes

*List of Semester 1, Sep 2019 courses will be updated
**HCRI will offer other optional courses when HCRI have agreed on a format
***Winter session (Dec-Feb)

4. DISSERTATION (MSc ONLY)

4.1 General Information
All students on the MSc pathway within the LEAP are required to submit a dissertation on a topic approved by the Programme Director. Dissertations should contain an element of original research which may be achieved through reflection and reading as well as through the collection of primary or secondary data. The dissertation contributes a third of a programme’s assessment (60 credits of 180 for a Master’s programme).

Dissertation word length

        • 12,000-15,000 words.
        • The word count includes chapter footnotes and endnotes.
        • The word count does not include references, interview transcripts and abstracts. However no more than five pages of appendices are permitted.
        • Ideally you should aim for 15,000 words. Your supervisor will guide you and ensure you are clear on word length requirements and potential implications.
        • You must observe the word limit specified for each assessment. The upper limit is an absolute maximum and must not be exceeded (there is no ‘10% rule’).

Submission arrangement
You are required to submit the final copy of your dissertation on Blackboard within 10 months from the approval of the dissertation topic.

As with coursework assessment, the mitigating circumstances mechanism also applies to dissertations. If you consider that your dissertation may be delayed due to ‘unforeseen’ and ‘unpreventable’ circumstances you should submit a mitigating circumstances application here, along with supporting documentation. All work to be considered under Mitigating Circumstances should be submitted as soon as possible

The standard late penalty is applied to dissertations
Any assessed coursework submitted after the deadline without good cause will incur a penalty determined by the lateness of its arrival:

        • ten marks will be deducted for the first day after the deadline
        • ten additional marks will be deducted for each day thereafter (including weekends)

Where relevant, students should alert their supervisor to any extenuating circumstances well in advance of the submission deadline.

Students who do not submit or fail the dissertation component will normally be granted one opportunity to resubmit unless they have approved and verified mitigating circumstances.

Assessment Arrangement
Once submitted, dissertations are independently assessed by two internal markers. A sample of dissertations is sent to the relevant external examiner for the programme, who validates standards. Final marks are confirmed by the Board of Examiners.

Dissertation Preparation

4.2 Dissertation Topic
It is important that you begin the process of choosing a topic as soon as possible. There are, of course, no hard-and-fast rules on how to choose a dissertation topic. However, a sensible approach is to identify a broad area of study – for example, related to one of operational challenges in your humanitarian practice – but then to narrow this down to a set of more focused research questions or hypotheses. Try to avoid something vague, and instead choose something tighter and more focused. Secondly, you must select a topic which interests you and will retain your enthusiasm for many months, but also one which is practical within the available time. This seems an obvious point to make, but one which nevertheless is often overlooked as students select topics which they think will appeal to potential supervisors, but which are of little personal interest. Such an approach is rarely successful since any topic must be of sufficient interest to retain your attention for several months. In the initial stages, it is likely that some of you will have difficulty in selecting a topic. For initial ideas, it is often useful to look through recent academic journal publications to gain an idea of broad fields of contemporary research interest. You can also search for titles of recently-completed dissertations via the University library catalogue both at University of Manchester and Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine. They can offer some initial pointers about possible research topics. Bear in mind, however, that the quality, focus and structure of dissertations varies.

Allocations of Supervisors
The Director of the LEAP programme will assign dissertation supervisors. Please note – allocation will be assigned according to areas of research (both in terms of research topic and geographic location). You cannot request a specific member of staff as your supervisor, unless you have agreed the topic with them prior to submitting your research topic.

Ethical Approval for Dissertation Research
As a postgraduate student writing a thesis or dissertation, you must think carefully about the ethical issues raised by your particular project. This will involve considering the research ethics norms of your discipline and consulting up to date guidance produced by relevant disciplinary or professional bodies. It may also involve applying for ethical approval from the University.

The key principle here is that all research projects conducted by University staff or students that involve human participants in a way that might harm, disturb or upset them (however slight the possibility) or where they can be deemed to be in a vulnerable or disadvantageous situation, must receive approval from a designated screening panel using an agreed template at School level. No work on a research project that involves ethical issues can take place until pre-screening has been fully completed and, if required, formal ethical approval has been obtained.

Research that takes place in unpredictable and volatile environments, engages with vulnerable or dependent human participants, asks participants to provide personal and sensitive information likely to lead to significant levels of distress and/or otherwise presents more than a minimal level of risk to researcher or research participants must be reviewed by the SALC Research Ethics Panel and then forwarded to the University Research Ethics Committee for approval.

If your research does involve contact with human participants, including online or virtual contact, you must consider whether you can apply for ethical approval via the SALC Ethics Template. The template allows the SALC Research Ethics Panel to approve research with adults and children (where that research is carried out in an accredited setting such as a cultural institution, school or youth club and where the child is accompanied by a carer or professional with a duty of care). Research covered by the template must also not ask participants to provide personal and sensitive information likely to lead to significant levels of distress, or present more than a minimal level of risk to researchers and/or research participants. The template adheres to accepted principles of informed consent and University regulations on data management and IT security.

If any research requires the ethical approval of MSF and other organizations, please discuss with academic supervisor prior to apply ethical approval of the SALC ethics committee.

Structure for Dissertation
Your dissertation is likely to be structured along the following lines. It is helpful to have brief introductory and concluding paragraphs for each chapter to introduce its content and draw findings together and link into the next chapter.

        • Introduction
        • Literature review
        • Methodology
        • Results
        • Discussion/ Case Study
        • Conclusion
        • Bibliography /References, covering all works cited in the main text
        • Appendix: Any other relevant reference materials, which may be presented in the appendices

Timetable* (one-year pathway** for dissertation)

Key date Activity
1st month •        Dissertation topic submission (from potential topic based on ‘Research into Practice’) (1st week)

•        Allocation of academic supervisor (1st- 2nd week)

•        Dissertation topic approval (2nd week)

2nd Month •        Dissertation proposal submission (1st week)

•        Ethical approval*** for research methods (1st – 2nd week)

•        Dissertation proposal feedback and revision (3rd week)

•        Dissertation proposal approval (3rd – 4th week)

3rd – 10th Month •        Dissertation project period (e.g. fieldwork, primary or secondary data collection, analysis, and writing-up etc.)
11th Month •        Dissertation submission date
12th Month •        Final examination board

•        Receive notification of board decision

*To be updated with key dates when you complete course works

**One-year pathway is expected but can be shortened upon your research methods (but still any pathways requires 600 study hours); please contact your academic supervisor and LEAP programme managers if your dissertation project needs to be completed in a shorter period.

***Any research projects requiring IRB (Institutional Review Board for human research ethics) approval should start their IRB application process as early as possible.

4.3 Dissertation Supervision
The initiative for requesting supervision lies entirely with you, the student. Once your supervisor has been allocated you need to agree methods of getting in contact with your own supervisor: email is usually the best way. You must ensure that dissertation supervisors are kept fully informed on progress and difficulties, and that you prime them with specific questions about issues on which you want feedback. The onus is on you to make sure that you arrange contact with your supervisor: you will not be ‘chased’ by supervisors.

Your responsibilities include:

          • Discussing with your supervisor the type of guidance and comment that you find helpful.
          • Beginning the submission of title process, including submission of ethical issues and/or risk assessment forms if applicable.
          • Taking the initiative in arranging consultations, raising questions, problems or difficulties encountered.
          • Maintaining a schedule of work as agreed with your supervisor.
          • Delivering notice of submission to the postgraduate office at the time of submitting the dissertation.
          • Keeping any data you have collected (such as responses to interview questions and questionnaires) in a safe place until such time as the assessment of your dissertation has been fully and formally completed.
          • Submitting the completed dissertation via Turnitin on the agreed date. Submission of your completed thesis will be the same procedure as submitting assignments in the past.

The role of the supervisor is to:

          • give guidance concerning the nature of the research process, the standard of work required and in planning the programme of research involved.
          • establish at an early stage the supervisor’s responsibilities in relation to the student’s written work, including the nature of guidance and comments to be offered as work proceeds.
          • agree completion dates for successive stages of the work, receiving first draft chapters as appropriate and returning written material with constructive criticism on the broad shape and structure of the work (but not on its detailed content).
          • provide advice and guidance to help improve the quality of the work. At all times, however, it must be made clear that dissertation preparation for a higher degree is undertaken within the general principle that the dissertation must be the student’s own work.

4.4 Assessment Criteria
The final dissertation aims at enhancing your ability to carry out an independent piece of research with guidance from dissertation supervisors. Your dissertation will be fully double marked (non-blind) by two independent internal examiners rather than moderated. One of the internal examiners for the dissertation may be the dissertation supervisor while the other internal examiner must be a member of staff who has had no connection with the student’s dissertation. As they are fully double marked (not sampled), moderators can suggest a mark change to individual dissertations. External examiners will be sent a sample of dissertations, which will include fails and borderlines as well as a representative sample from each ten-per cent band. However, all dissertations will be available to the external examiner on request

          • Marks Below 30%: The work fails to provide a competent description of the topic, and falls far short of a competent discussion. It is poorly structured and has no coherent argument. It displays no awareness at all of theoretical or critical ideas such as those learned on the core course units. The style and presentation are so poor as to seriously impair communication and there is no evidence that the principles applicable to academic writing in the Humanities have been understood.
          • Marks 30 – 39%: The work is almost wholly descriptive. It reveals little awareness of theoretical or critical ideas such as those learned on the core course units and makes no sustained or developed attempt to apply them in practice. The work displays some potential to move from description to discussion of the topic and to structure a basic argument derived from this descriptive approach but it fails to achieve this in clearly identifiable respects. The style and presentation are poor. There is little evidence that the principles applicable to academic writing in the Humanities have been understood, but communication is maintained.
          • Marks 40 – 49%: The work provides a superficial discussion of the topic but remains predominantly descriptive. It demonstrates a basic grasp of the topic but is lacking in critical or analytical insight in general. It reveals some awareness of theoretical or critical ideas such as those learned on the core course units, but attempts to apply them in practice are inappropriate or confused. An identifiable argument is discernible but this is poorly and inconsistently sustained. The style and presentation exhibit a large number of errors but there is some evidence that the principles applicable to academic writing in the Humanities have been understood. The candidate may be permitted to resubmit (once only) and attempt to rectify faults identified if they wish to achieve a pass at Master’s level.
          • Marks 50 – 59%: The work demonstrates a reasonable understanding of the topic and the discussion provides some evidence of analytical thought. The work also shows comprehension of critical or theoretical ideas such as those learned on the core course units, but attempts to use these ideas relevantly in practice are limited in scope. The approach is generally unambitious, but a coherent argument is in place. There is an awareness of relevant secondary literature and an ability to evidence assertions by reference to relevant literature/research. The work exhibits a certain number of errors of style and presentation but an adherence to the principles applicable to academic writing in the Humanities is predominant.
          • Marks 60 – 69%: The work demonstrates a thorough understanding of the topic, and provides a good discussion of it with appropriate examples. The work shows an awareness of critical or theoretical ideas such as those learned on the core course units, supported by an ability to use these ideas relevantly in critical practice. The argument is clearly structured and the students have begun to develop new ideas on the texts or objects of study, revealing an ability to critically evaluate existing research in the area. There is some evidence of potential for conducting research at a higher level, but this may not be wholly consistent. There are few errors in style and presentation and the work demonstrates that the principles applicable to academic writing in the Humanities have been fully understood.
          • Marks 70 – 79%: The work is focused and comprehensive, demonstrating a through and sophisticated grasp of the topic. The work is based on wide reading in a range of source materials and shows clear originality. The work goes well beyond the mere exposition of ideas, providing a sustained and lucid argument. An in depth awareness of critical or theoretical ideas, such as those learned on the core course units, is demonstrated through relevant and consistent application in critical practice. The work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate existing research on the object of study in a confident, directed manner, giving clear evidence of the candidate’s ability to complete a research degree successfully. There are no substantial or recurrent errors in style and presentation and the work demonstrates that the principles applicable to academic writing in the Humanities have been fully understood and internalised as good practice.
          • Marks above 80%: The work is excellent in every respect. It shows extensive knowledge of both the topic and the academic context(s) in which it is applied. A complex, original and relevant application of critical or theoretical ideas such as those learned on the core course units is demonstrated in critical practice. There is clear evidence of an ability to critically evaluate existing research on the object of study as the basis for identifying and defining new fields of research. The work demonstrates considerable originality and is of publishable or near-publishable quality making a significant contribution at the forefront of the discipline. The style and presentation are virtually faultless.

4.5 Extensions, Corrections, Fail and Resubmission

          • Extensions to the submission date for dissertations: this may be sought where circumstances, outside of students’ control, will delay the completion and submission by the published date.
          • Minor Corrections: Very exceptionally, examiners may decide that a dissertation should be awarded a pass, subject to minor corrections being made. Usually these minor corrections relate to the format and presentation of the dissertation, and must be completed within 4 weeks. Failure to complete the changes to the satisfaction of the examiners within this time can result in the dissertation being failed and the Postgraduate Diploma being awarded.
          • Failed Dissertations/ Fail, With Permission to Resubmit: Dissertations that do not achieve the 50% pass mark will be failed. Examiners may recommend that the student be given permission to resubmit the dissertation. In this case, feedback will be provided by the dissertation Supervisor, and a new deadline for the resubmission set. (Please note, a fee maybe charged for resubmission.)

5. ASSESSMENT

5.1 Type of assessed work
The methods of summative assessments include essays and reports based on work-based projects; assessed presentations; written examination. The programme will comply with the University policy regarding anonymous marking. In addition all submitted work will be marked anonymously by two independent staff members, one functioning as a first marker and the other as a moderator. The agreed internal marks are then forwarded to the subject external examiner with a sample of assessed work for moderation. The results are considered anonymously at the meeting of the board of examiners.

          • Essays: The Essays develop your ability to critically analyse, synthesise and communicate in a systematic manner. Usually marks for assessed essays (or other assessed work) submitted in the course of the year contribute a certain percentage to the overall mark for the course unit. These essays or other pieces of work should be completed as directed by the lecturer or tutor concerned. You should check most carefully the instructions and deadlines issued in each course unit you are taking, especially as the requirements will vary from unit to unit.
          • Oral presentation: The oral presentation component of assessed presentations and debates aims to assess student’s ability to verbally communicate, argue and defend their work. Oral presentations and debates are assessed by members of staff who follow programme guidelines for assessment in terms of structure of arguments, the use of sources, presentation skills and use of audio-visual media, and effectiveness of group work (where appropriate). Presentation skills including researching sources, blog writing, planning presentations, poster design, public speaking and the use of audio-visual media are developed during seminar sessions. These sessions provide opportunities for students to develop the necessary skills for delivering effective presentations, provide students with an understanding of the assessment criteria for oral presentations, and enable seminar-leader guided advance preparation for presentations and workshops.
          • Written examination and quizzes: On certain face to face course-units, students’ performance may be assessed by means of an invigilated formal examination in an examination room. It aims to ensure students have acquired the requisite knowledge and understanding to move onto the next part of the course.

5.2 Submission of work
The University fully supports the use of Turnitin as web-based systems (accessed via Blackboard) for the submission and marking of assessed coursework. The Turnitin software tool is also used to check submitted work for plagiarism and to locate sources of material in suspected cases of academic malpractice. Guidance for students on plagiarism and other forms of academic malpractice can be found here.

5.3 Feedback
Written feedback, in line with University of Manchester and Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine guidelines, is provided for all summative assessments (essays, exams, presentations etc.) in order to help you further develop your skills.

5.4 Plagiarism Detection
All work is submitted via Turnitin (available via Blackboard). Turnitin is a plagiarism detection software which allows markers to see if work has been copied from other sources or from other students. Submitting the same essay – or parts of it – for two different assignments also counts as plagiarism. Students will be advised on how to submit their assignments through Turnitin at the start of the course.

Please note: The LEAP takes all cases of plagiarism very seriously. You are advised to seek further information on plagiarism and Turnitin here.

5.5 Late Submission of Coursework Policy
More information can be found here.

5.6 Compensation and Resubmission

          • A student on any programme whose failures in units at the first attempt exceed 30 credits will be deemed to have failed the programme.
          • A student registered on a Postgraduate Certificate who fails to satisfy the Examiners in any assessment of taught units may be permitted to resubmit the assessment or retake the examination on one further occasion, up to a maximum of 30 credits.
          • Students may be awarded a compensated pass for a Postgraduate Certificate when they fail in units totalling no more than 15 credits and receive a mark of 30 – 39% for those failed units.
          • The maximum number of credits that can be compensated and/or resubmitted for the Postgraduate Certificate is 30.
          • A student registered on a Postgraduate Diploma who fails to satisfy the examiners in the assessment of taught units may be permitted to resubmit the assessment or retake the examination on one further occasion, up to a maximum of 60 credits.
          • Students may be awarded a compensated pass for a Postgraduate Diploma when they fail in units totalling no more than 30 credits and receive a mark of at least 30 – 39% for those failed units.
          • The maximum number of credits that can be compensated and/or resubmitted for the Postgraduate Diploma is 60.
          • A student registered on a Masters Programme who fails to satisfy the Examiners in the assessment of taught units may be permitted to resubmit the assessment or retake the examination on one further occasion, up to a maximum of 60 credits.
          • Students may be awarded a compensated pass for a Masters Programme when they fail in units totalling no more than 30 credits and receive a mark of at least 40 – 49% for those failed units.
          • The maximum number of credits that can be compensated and/or resubmitted for the Masters Programme is 60.
          • Please note that the maximum number of credits that can be compensated and/or resubmitted across all three programmes (if you choose to progress through to the Masters Programme) is 60. If you exceed this you will be exited at the appropriate award level (Certificate or Diploma)
          • Students may, in exceptional mitigating circumstances, and with prior permission of the Faculty, be allowed to re-take the entire programme subject to all outstanding fees being paid.

5.7 Word limit
All subject areas have agreed assessment lengths for written assessments (such as essays, reports etc.) within their degree programmes. At each level the target word count or range for a written piece is indicative of the optimum length required to compose a successful essay at that level, and is designed to correspond as closely as possible to the weighting that the assessment has within the course unit.

The purpose of enforcing word limits is (a) to ensure parity and fairness by creating a level playing field; (b) to help students produce well-focused and cogent written work; (c) to instill the discipline essential for real-life writing tasks, where word limits are often rigid; and (d) to ensure that students acquire the ability to edit their writing effectively and cut away inessential material, skills invaluable both for academic work and the workplace.

          • you must observe the word limit specified for each assessment. The upper limit is an absolute maximum and must not be exceeded (there is no ‘10% rule’)
          • the word count for each piece of written work must be displayed clearly on the top right-hand side of the first page
          • word count is here defined as including quotations and the footnotes or endnotes in the essay itself. It does not include the bibliography or any appendices. Appendices are for supporting, illustrative material only; they may not be used to elaborate or extend the argument
          • material that exceeds the upper limit will not be read or considered in the marking

It is not expected that staff will check individual submissions unless they are concerned that the stipulated length has been exceeded.

6. AWARD CRITERIA AND PROGRESSION

6.1 Classification

          • To obtain a pass for a Postgraduate Certificate, the student is required to obtain 60 credits.
          • To obtain a pass for a Postgraduate Diploma, the student is required to obtain 120 credits.
          • To obtain a pass for a Degree of Master, the student is required to obtain 180 credits

6.2 Award Criteria: MSc student
You will be awarded your MSc according to the following criteria:

MSc Distinction: A Distinction will normally be awarded if the following criteria are met:

          • An average mark, at first assessment, of at least 70%, based on the weighted programme as a whole.
          • In order to achieve the distinction, a student must have passed the requisite minimum credits of the MSc in Humanitarian Practice degree regulations (180 credits).
          • Students with credit awarded as a result of a referral or compensated mark will not be eligible for the award of distinction, only a merit or a pass.

MSc Merit: A Merit will normally be awarded if the following criteria are met:

          • An average mark of at least 60%, based on the weighted programme as a whole.
          • In order to achieve the merit, a student must have passed the requisite minimum credits of the MSc in Humanitarian Practice degree regulations (180 credits).

MSc Pass: A Pass will normally be awarded if the following criteria are met:

          • An average mark of 59.9% or less based on the weighted programme as a whole.
          • In order to achieve the pass, a student must have passed the requisite minimum credits of the MSc in Humanitarian Practice degree regulations (180 credits).

Borderline Zones: A student whose total mark at the first assessment is within the boundary zone specified in the Postgraduate Regulations, must be considered for the higher award as long as the following are satisfied:

          • For the award of distinction, all course units must have been passed at the first attempt without any compensation.
          • 120 out of 180 credits are equal to/ or higher than the final award.

 

          • Progression: PG Diploma and PG Certificate student

After successfully completing the required assessment, students will be permitted to progress to the Postgraduate Diploma or MSc on condition that:

          • the student achieved a pass mark of 50% or more for each unit;
          • the award of the Postgraduate Certificate is rescinded for Postgraduate Diploma or MSc
          • the award of the Postgraduate Certificate and/or Postgraduate Diploma is rescinded for MSc.

Students will normally successfully complete the taught component of the Degree of Master before they can progress to the dissertation (or equivalent), and must successfully complete the taught component before submission of the dissertation (or equivalent).

In these circumstances, for a Postgraduate Diploma, students will normally be required to complete the programme no more than four academic years after initial registration, or for a Degree of Master, no more than five academic years after initial registration.

7. ACADEMIC MALPRACTICE / PLAGIARISM

It is essential that you are aware of what is acceptable and unacceptable practice in terms of completing assignments that are a product of your own studies and research. Academic malpractice is any activity – intentional or otherwise – that is likely to undermine the integrity essential to scholarship and research. It includes plagiarism, collusion, fabrication or falsification of results, and anything else that could result in unearned or undeserved credit for those committing it. Academic malpractice can result from a deliberate act of cheating or may be committed unintentionally. Whether intended or not, all incidents of academic malpractice will be treated seriously by the University. ‘Academic Malpractice: Procedure for the Handling of Cases’ produced by the Student Support and Wellbeing Office.

Instances of malpractice (plagiarism) include:
Plagiarism is the presentation, deliberately or accidently, of the ideas, work or words of other people without proper, clear and unambiguous acknowledgement. It includes the copying of the work of any other person, including another student. The following are considered plagiarism:

          • referencing whose inadequacy vitiates the integrity of the work
          • a bibliography that omits texts drawn on in the main body of the work (compounding the failure to cite them in the main text and/or references)
          • more than isolated examples of the omission of quotation marks from quotes
          • close paraphrasing of phrases or sentences of someone else’s material without direct and immediate acknowledgement (anything more than isolated examples where the source is reference properly elsewhere)
          • extensive misuse of secondary quotations
          • copying the work of another student, or submitting material from ‘essay banks’
          • turning in someone else’s work as your own
          • copying words or ideas from someone else without giving credit
          • failing to put a quotation in quotation marks
          • giving incorrect information about the source of a quotation
          • changing words but copying the sentence structure of a source without giving credit
          • changing words but using the structure of an argument from a source without giving credit
          • Paraphrasing or summarising part of a source without giving credit

Self-Plagiarism is the submission, in whole or in part, of a student’s own work where such work has been previously submitted for summative or formative assessment.

Collusion is when a student collaborates with another student or students on an assessment that is intended to be entirely their own work. Allowing another student to copy your work is also considered to be collusion and both the copier and the provider of the work are liable to be penalised. Please note that some pieces of assessment are collaborative, which means that several students will contribute to a single piece of work. This is not collusion as the expectation is that the group will submit a single piece of work from all of them.

Fabrication or falsification of data or results by individual students or groups of students is the presentation or inclusion in a piece of work of figures or data which have been made up or altered and which have no basis in verifiable sources.

Instances of plagiarism will be referred to the School Academic Malpractice Officer. Markers will record a pre-penalty mark on the feedback form, indicating that this is the notional mark that the portions of the work uncontaminated by malpractice would have received. The programme administrator will apply the penalty and not the academic staff.

You are advised to familiarise yourself with the guidance on academic malpractice and plagiarism available here.

We would also advise all students to view the tutorial offered online by the UoM library at their My Learning Essentials website. The website also has online and in person tutorials on researching, note taking and referencing and constitutes a very useful tool for you to learn skills required at university:

Avoiding Plagiarism tutorial.

My Learning Essentials

 

8 STYLE GUIDANCE

All assessed coursework submitted by LEAP students must use a recognised system of academic referencing correctly and consistently. Proper referencing is necessary to avoid plagiarism and to allow the reader to find sources, trace the development of your argument or assess the depth of your research. As HCRI is an interdisciplinary field of study, you can utilise both the Harvard style and the Footnote/Numeric style during the course. Note: You must use one or the other (not a combination of both!) and apply it consistently to all of your work. This short guide outlines some basic principles of both systems. For further clarification style guides to the Harvard and Numeric styles are available online usually through other university institutions. Increasingly publications are available in electronic format. But, where the electronic version duplicates the print copy (like a PDF journal article or electronic book) please cite it as a print publication.

Harvard Referencing: The Harvard style of referencing is used broadly across the arts and humanities. Here publications and other sources are cited in the text, e.g. (Pearce, 2002) and a list of these citations is included at the end of the essay or dissertation, in alphabetical order by authorship with date. This system is useful because numerical referencing in the form of footnotes can then be used for explanative notes instead of citation.

Example

Hartman (2005), in her seminal study on urban regeneration, found no evidence to support the role of charitable donations. However, Okuda concludes that “donations can have some positive impact if the donors are involved throughout the project’s history” (1995:22). The present fieldwork indicated support for the latter viewpoint from the Bamako project (Toure 2000).

 

Reference List

Hartman, P.V. (2005) ‘Urban regeneration in the Third World’, Regeneration Today, vol. 13, no. 4, pp. 23-45.

 

Okuda, Z. (1995) Charities, Donors and Projects, Penguin, London.

 

Toure, S. (2000) Personal interview with author, Ministry of Irrigation, Bamako, Mali, 14 Nov. 

Citations in Your Text

          • Author: e.g. Jameson (1999) first explained that…
          • Two authors: e.g. Rasmussen and Phillips (2005) make the point that…
          • More than two authors – use et al: e.g. it was found by Rasmussen et al. (1998) that…
          • More than one item by same author in same year – use lettering: g. (Jameson 2004a). … (Jameson 2004b).
          • Quote – use page number wherever possible: g. “making information systems harder to develop” (Heeks 2001: 45).
          • Multiple citations in a list – use date order: g. (Zifcak 2001; Aucoin 2002; Boston et al. 2003).
          • Organisational authorship: e.g. for the revised policy document (Dept. of Internal Affairs 1997).
          • Web site – cite as for author/organisation rules; do not put just the Web address.
          • Secondary references: e.g. Jones (1997 cited in Tomas & Rayus 2003) states… — note include both items in the reference list.
          • No author – for newspaper or magazine – use name of newspaper/magazine: e.g. (The Economist 2006).
          • No author – use the title of the work: e.g. (Beating the budget blues 1999).

 

Notes: Citations at the end of sentences should appear inside the full stop. 

Reference List

Arrange in alphabetical order of author surname.

Book:

Author/Editor surname, initials. (Year) Book Title in Italics, Publisher, Place of publication.

          • Hogan, J.F. (2003) Urban Profiling in Developing Countries, Harper, New York.

Two authors (note edition):
First author surname, initials. & Second author surname, initials. Rest as per normal.

          • Link, C.J. & MacLean, P. (2001) Rapid Rural Appraisal, 3rd edn, Polity Press, London.

Many authors:
Don’t use et al in reference list.

          • Sheridan, M.C., Jacobs, C., Thomas, A. & Raward, S. (1998) The Government Management Primer, Oxford University Press, Oxford.

Edited book:
Put (ed) or (eds) after name:

          • Heeks, R.B. & Jones, G. (eds) (2005) ICTs in High Mountain Regions, Routledge, London.

Chapter in book/proceedings:
Author name(s). (Year) ‘Chapter title’, in Book Title, eds Editors names, Publisher, Place of publication, Page numbers.

          • Walsham, G. (1992) ‘Centralisation of data processing’, in Social Implications of IT, S. Bhatnagar & M. Odedra (eds), McGraw-Hill, New Delhi, pp. 134-51.

Journal article:
Author surname, initials. (Year) ‘Title of article’, Title of Journal, Vol. no., Part/issue no., Page numbers.

          • Wittmer, P. (2000) ‘Project control under the microscope’, Journal of International Development, vol. 16, no. 5, pp. 124-32.

 Newspaper article:
Author surname, initials. (Year) ‘Title of article’, Title of Newspaper [place], Date, Page number(s).

          • Kennedy, C. (1999) ‘China feels the heat of Clinton campaign’, The Guardian [London], 13 Dec., p. 12.

Item with no author:
Item title. (Year) then book publisher/journal location details as per normal.

          • Beating the budget blues. (1999) People Management, vol. 14, no. 14, p. 6.

Organisational document:
Organisation name. (Year) Title of Document, Organisation name again, place of publication.

          • UKCVO (2004) Best Practice for NGOs, UK Council for Voluntary Organisations, London.

Government document:
Name of government department. (Year) Title of Document. Government printer/publisher (or originating department), Place of publication.

          • Ministry of Rural Development. (1998) Rural Infrastructure Projects, Indian Government Stationery Office, New Delhi, India.
          • CIA (2004) Update Assessment on Iraq, Central Intelligence Agency, Washington, DC.

Conference paper:
Author details. (Year) ‘Title of paper’, paper presented at Title of conference, Place and date of conference.

          • Nichols, J.R. (1998) ‘Patterns of NGO development’, paper presented at the Development Studies Association annual conference, University of Bradford, UK, 12-14 September.

Interview:
Interviewee’s name. (Year) Personal interview, Place and date of interview.

          • Teller, J. (2006) Personal interview, Ibadan, Nigeria, 12 July.

Email message:
Author details. (Year) Message title, Email to whom [Online], Date sent, Available: Email: email address of recipient [date accessed]

          • Nicholson, B. (2004) Re: Indian software industry, Email to R. Heeks [Online], 13 Oct., Available: Email: richard.heeks@manchester.ac.uk [Accessed: 14 October 2004]

Web page/document:
Author details. (Year) Page title/heading, Publisher/organisation [Online], Available: URL [date accessed]

          • Bradstock, T. (2003) Egypt Online Network, Manchester College of Technology [Online], Available: http://www.mct.ac.uk/cfs/egypt.html [Accessed: 14 September 2007]

Notes: if no author is apparent, use organisation name or page title; if publication date is not clear put (n.d.)

Foreign language document:
Use relevant reference format given above, all translated into English, then give the original language title in brackets after the translated title. E.g.

          • Ministry of Foreign Affairs (2003) Software Production and Trade in Latin America [Producción y Comercio de Software en América Latina], Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Note: What matters most is a) that the reader could locate any item in your reference list; b) that you are consistent: i.e. that you do all similar items the same way. 

Footnoting/ Numeric Style
Use numbered footnotes to give citation details in addition to a bibliography. For second or later mention of the same work in footnotes, use: author, date (and page number or numbers where relevant). Avoid using ibid or op. cit.

Example

Hartman, in her seminal study on urban regeneration, found no evidence to support the role of charitable donations.1 However, Okuda concludes that ‘donations can have some positive impact if the donors are involved throughout the project’s history’.2 The present fieldwork indicated support for the latter viewpoint from the Bamako project.3

1 Paula V. Hartman, ‘Urban regeneration in the Third World’, Regeneration Today, 13 [4] (2005), pp. 23-45.

2 Zena Okuda, Charities, Donors and Projects (London, 1995) p. 22.

3 Susan Toure, Personal interview, date, place.

Notes: Try to place all footnotes after punctuation, preferably after a full stop.

Footnotes & Bibliographies
Footnotes and Bibliographies are prepared in a similar way. There are, however, slight differences between the two. This guide should be referred to as you get used to all the different rules and regulations. Try to place all footnotes after punctuation.

Footnotes in text
Footnotes are prepared according to similar rules to bibliographic references, but with three important differences:

          1. In footnotes, we list the forename before the surname: ‘Mary Smith’, not ‘Smith, Mary’.
          2. An entry only appears once in a bibliography, but you may have to refer to the same work several times in footnotes. When you mention the same book, article or essay more than once in your footnotes, you use the full citation the first time, but thereafter you use what is called ‘short form citation.’ We no longer use ibid. or op. cit. or other devices.
          3. In footnotes, we always need to indicate the specific page or pages we have taken our information from. This means that we end each footnote by specifying the exact page (signified by p.) or pages (signified by pp.) on which we found that specific piece of information or argument.

Books – First citation:
Mary Poovey, Making a Social Body: British Cultural Formation, 1830-1864 (Chicago, 1995), pp.18-22.

Books – Second and subsequent citations:
Poovey, Making a Social Body, p. 38. 

Essays in Books – First citation:
David Frisby, ‘The Metropolis as Text: Otto Wagner and Vienna’s “Second Renaissance”’, in Neil Leach (ed.), The Hieroglyphics of Space (London, 2002), pp. 22-24. [The pages on which the information can be found.]

Essays in Books – Second and subsequent citations:
Frisby, ‘The Metropolis as Text’, p. 28.

Articles in Journals – First citation:
Graeme Gilloch, ‘The Heroic Pedestrian or the Pedestrian Hero? Walter Benjamin and the Flâneur’, Telos 91 (1992), p. 116. [The page on which the information can be found.]

Articles in Journals – Second and subsequent citations:
Gilloch, ‘The Heroic Pedestrian or the Pedestrian Hero?’, p. 117. 

Bibliographies
The bibliography needs to be prepared according to the following rules. There are variations to these rules which different historians may apply, but the key thing is for you to be consistent throughout your work. Pay attention to your colons, commas, full stops, brackets and use of italics. In terms of secondary sources, you will use three major types in your work: books, essays in books, and articles in journals.

Books:
Surname, Forename. Full Title of Book in Italics: Including Subtitles and Dates After a Colon with Each Important Word Written with a Capital (Place of Publication Nearest to You, Date of Publication).

E.g.: Haine, Scott. The World of the Paris Café: Sociability among the French Working Class, 1789- 1914 (London, 1996). Poovey, Mary. Making a Social Body: British Cultural Formation, 1830-1864 (Chicago, 1995).

Essays in Books:
Surname, Forename. ‘Full Title of Essay in Single Inverted Commas but not Italics: “Double Inverted Commas are for Quotes Within the Title”’, in Firstname Surname (ed. [or eds. if there is more than one editor]), Full Title of Book in Italics (Place of Publication Nearest to You, Date of Publication), pp. 123-456 [the page numbers of the essay in the book must be included].

E.g.: Frisby, David. ‘The Metropolis as Text: Otto Wagner and Vienna’s “Second Renaissance”’, in Neil Leach (ed.), The Hieroglyphics of Space (London, 2002), pp. 15-30. Jelavich, Peter. ‘Performing High and Low: Jews in Modern Theater, Cabaret, Revue and Film’, in Emily Bilski (ed.), Berlin Metropolis: Jews and the New Culture, 1890-1918 (London, 1999), pp. 208- 235.

Articles in Journals:
Surname, Forename. ‘Full Title of the Article in Single Inverted Commas but not Italics: “Double Inverted Commas are for Quotes Within the Title”’, Full Title of Journal in Italics 4 [Number of journal in year or in series] (Year in Brackets), pp. 123-456 [the page numbers of the article in the journal must be included].

E.g.: Garside, Paul. ‘“Unhealthy Areas”: Town Planning, Eugenics and the Slums, 1890-1945’, Planning Perspectives 3 (1988), pp. 24-46. Gilloch, Graeme. ‘The Heroic Pedestrian or the Pedestrian Hero? Walter Benjamin and the Flâneur’, Telos 91 (1992), pp. 108-117.

 

9. KEY CONTACTS
University of Manchester

Jiho Cha

LEAP Programme Director, Senior Lecturer in Humanitarian Studies

C2.15, Ellen Wilkinson Building, Oxford Road, Manchester

Email: jiho.cha@manchester.ac.uk

 

Thomas J. Blackburn

HCRI Coordinator

C1.49 Ellen Wilkinson Building

Email: thomas.blackburn@manchester.ac.uk

 

Andrew Richardson

eLearning Manager

Email: Andrew.richardson@manchester.ac.uk

 

Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine

Hayoung Lee

LEAP Programme Director, Senior lecturer in humanitarian practice

Pembroke Place, Liverpool

Email: hayoung.lee@lstmed.ac.uk

 

Mary Lyons

Senior lecturer public health

Pembroke Place, Liverpool, L3 5QA

Email: Mary.lyons@lstmed.ac.uk

 

Magda Klimontowska

Project Manager

Pembroke Place, Liverpool

Email: Magdalena.Klimontowska@lstmed.ac.uk

 

Daniel Robinson

Manager, Technology Enhanced Learning Unit

Pembroke Place, Liverpool

Email:Dan.Robinson@lstmed.ac.uk

 

Médecins Sans Frontières 

Caroline King

LEAP Project Manager, MSF London

Email: caroline.king@london.msf.org

 

Jake Leyland

LEAP Project Assistant, MSF London

Email: ake.leyland@london.msf.org

 

Marion Pechayre

Director of Studies at CRASH, MSF Paris

Email: Marion.Pechayre@paris.msf.org

 

10. ACADEMIC STAFF AND EXPERTS

Students will have access to leading multi-disciplinary academic staff in HCRI and LSTM:

Humanitarian and Conflict Response Institute (HCRI), University of Manchester

Dr. Jiho Cha, Senior Lecturer in Humanitarian Studies (LEAP program director; core module convener)
Jiho is a physician, global health scholar, and field humanitarian. After completing clinical training in 2005, he has worked for North Korean and other marginalized populations around the world (North Korea, Papua New Guinea, Pakistan, Indonesia, China) through non-governmental (Médecins Sans Frontières, Human Rights Watch, Medipeace), governmental (South Korean Ministry of Unification) and international organizations (International Organization for Migration). His research interests lie in political inequality and health, implementation science with health system and digital technologies, multidisciplinary methods in hard to reach population. He received his PhD in international health at the Johns Hopkins University, MD at the Donga University and MSc in forced migration at the University of Oxford.

Professor Bertrand Taithe, HCRI Executive Director (LEAP SC member; core module convener)
Born in France, Professor Bertrand Taithe studied at the Sorbonne with Professor François Crouzet and began his career as a historian of urban sociology. He later moved into the history of medicine and sexuality and is particularly interested in the history of humanitarian aid. Professor Taithe is a prolific author, Editor of the European Review of History, and is the Executive Director of the Humanitarian and Conflict Response Institute.

Dr. Adele Aubrey, Institute Manager (LEAP SC member)
Adele completed a Doctorate in Education at the University of Manchester in enquiry-based learning and dimensions of contextualized power within higher education teaching and learning environments. A fellow of the Higher Education Academy, she has contributed to a diverse portfolio of innovative, international and collaborative curriculum design projects. Her current research project is the development, piloting and assessment of a European training package, focused on operational team training, and training-of trainers for Emergency Medical Teams within low-income countries and resource-poor settings.

Core Academic Staff

Dr Catherine Arthur, Lecturer in Peace and Conflict Studies
Catherine is a Lecturer in Peace and Conflict Studies and joined the Humanitarian and Conflict Response Institute in 2018. Catherine’s research on post-colonial, post-conflict nation-building, identity politics, and symbols focuses particularly on Timor-Leste, and is informed by the Northern Ireland case study as a similarly transitional society. This research has developed from her background in Modern Languages, Hispanic and Lusophone Studies, and International Relations.

Dr Rony Brauman, Director
Qualified as a medical doctor, Rony Brauman has worked in the field of international medical assistance since 1977. Initially serving as a field physician in developing countries with Médecins San Frontières (France), he became the President of the organisation from 1982 -1994. Director of HCRI, Rony is also Associate Professor at L’Institut d’Études Politiques (Paris), and Director of Research at the MSF Foundation also in Paris.

Dr Eleanor Davey, Director of Postgraduate Research
Eleanor is a Senior Lecturer in History of Humanitarianism and obtained her undergraduate degree from the University of Melbourne and her PhD from Queen Mary, University of London (2011). From 2011-2014 she worked in the Humanitarian Policy Group at the Overseas Development Institute, where she led a project on the uses of history in humanitarian practice and policy.  Her doctoral research was on the evolution of French responses to the ‘third world’, from radical political engagement to humanitarianism, with a focus on Médecins Sans Frontières. Her latest research, funded by a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellowship, explores the relationship between humanitarianism and national liberation. Eleanor joined HCRI in May 2014 and also teaches in the history department.

Dr Maura Duffy, Lecturer in Global Health
Maura received an MA in International Development (Social Policy and Social Development) from the Global Development Institute, University of Manchester in 2006 and was awarded a PhD in International Development (also within GDI) in 2012. Maura took up the post of Lecturer in Global Health in 2012.

Dr Larissa Fast, Director of Research
Larissa is Senior Lecturer at in Humanitarian Studies. She is a scholar and practitioner with over two decades of experience at the intersection of research, policy, and practice related to humanitarianism, conflict, and peacebuilding. Her research examines the causes of and responses to violence against conflict interveners, such as aid workers and peacebuilders, the role of data and technology in humanitarian settings, and ways to make intervention more effective, ethical, and responsive to local needs and context. Larissa is author of Aid in Danger (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2014), and has published extensively in both scholarly and policy-focused outlets.

Professor Peter Gatrell, Professor of History
Peter obtained his undergraduate and PhD degrees from the University of Cambridge. He has spent most of his academic career at The University of Manchester, including working as Head of the School of History and Classics between 1997 and 2002 prior to becoming part of the School of Arts, Languages and Cultures. Peter’s research and teaching interests fall into two broad categories: population displacement in world history and the history of modern Europe. These twin interests are also brought together in his commitment to the cultural history of modern war.

Dr Jessica Hawkins, Lecturer in Humanitarian Studies
Jessica is the pathway lead for the MA in Humanitarian and Conflict Response. Her research interests are focused on state formation in developing countries from a historical sociology perspective. Specifically, her work looks at power relations within states including military and political power with a particular focus on intrastate conflict and state service delivery in Uganda. Jessica worked as a tutor in the Global Development Institute at The University of Manchester since 2010 and joined HCRI as a Lecturer in Humanitarian Studies.

 Dr Billy Haworth, Lecturer in International Disaster Management
Billy is the pathway lead for the MSc in International Disaster Management. He is a geographer specialising in public participation in digital mapping and geographic information systems (GIS), and the implications of these practices for a range of applications, including disaster management. His research interests include critical GIS, community mapping and disaster risk reduction, digital humanitarianism, rural livelihoods, citizen science, and spatial knowledge production. He completed his PhD at the University of Sydney in 2016, examining digital volunteering and community engagement in bushfire (wildfire) preparation. In 2017 he held a research and teaching position in GIS at the University of Western Australia.

Dr Kirsten Howarth, Lecturer in Humanitarianism and Conflict Response
Kirsten undertook her role in HCRI in January 2014. Prior to this, she was a Teaching Fellow in International Development at the Global Development at the University of Manchester. Kirsten completed her PhD in 2012, analysing the causes of post-war violence and crime in El Salvador. Her current research builds on from her PhD by examining urban violence and its humanitarian consequences.

Dr Amy Hughes, Clinical Academic Lecturer in Emergency Response
Dr Amy Hughes is heavily involved in the development of the UK International Emergency Trauma Register and training of its clinicians. The UKIETR aims to provide a structured approach to training of medical teams deploying to disasters to ensure a governed, co-ordinated, clinically competent and guided approach to medical care in disasters. The UK team has recently returned from Typhoon Haiyan. Amy is also completing a PhD – ‘The Role and Training of Foreign Medical Teams in Sudden Onset Disasters.’ She is course convener for the Emergency Humanitarian Assistance module and contributes to the Global Health Diploma. Clinically, Amy is an Emergency Medicine and Pre-Hospital Care clinician. She has completed the Diploma Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (Liv) and European Masters in Disaster Medicine.

Professor Tim Jacoby, Professor in International Relations
After working in Turkey and Nigeria during the 1990s, Tim won an ESRC-funded place on the International Conflict Analysis Masters degree programme at the University of Kent. He then completed his PhD and an ESRC Post-Doctoral Fellowship in the Department of Politics at the University of York from 1999-2003. Since 2005, he has been senior lecturer in conflict studies at the Institute for Development Policy & Management, the University of Manchester. His research concerns the historical sociology of state development, political violence and post-war reconstruction – with a particular focus on Turkey.

Dr Rubina Jasani, Lecturer in Humanitarianism & Conflict Response
Rubina’s areas of interest are anthropology of violence and reconstruction, medical anthropology with special focus on social suffering and mental illness, and the study of lived Islam in South Asia and the UK. Her doctoral work examined moral and material ‘reconstruction’ of life after an episode of ethnic violence in Gujarat, Western India in 2002. Working with survivors of ethnic violence, she became interested in mental illness and has completed two pieces of research on ethnicity and mental illness in inner city areas of Birmingham and is the qualitative lead on research studies looking at help-seeking and ‘institutional racism’. At HCRI, she aims to pursue further research in the areas of conflict, culture and mental health.

Eric Lepp, Senior Tutor in Humanitarian Studies
Eric is joining the HCRI staff as Senior Tutor in 2018-19 as he comes to the end of his PhD. His thesis focuses on post-peace agreement relationships in Northern Ireland, with a particular interest in the interplay between space and identity. His study involved following the supporters of the Belfast Giants professional ice hockey team for a season – as a Canadian he thought this was great. As he moves out of his PhD role his learning interests include spaces of encounter and coexistence, peace education, adaptable methodologies, identity and conflict, and resistance to power.

Dr Jenna Murray de Lopez, Lecturer in Humanitarian Studies and Global Health
Jenna is the pathway lead for the intercalating BSc in Global Health. She has an MA and PhD in Social Anthropology from the University of Manchester. Her doctoral research focussed on political economy and maternal health and identity in Chiapas, Mexico. She has a professional background in Reproductive and Sexual Health promotion and HIV prevention in both the UK and Mexico. Jenna worked for 7 years as a lecturer in Social Work and Social Policy at the University of Salford. She joined HCRI in 2016.

Dr Dylan O’Driscoll, Research Associate
Dylan is a Research Associate at HCRI working on the Evidence and Knowledge for Development (K4D) programme. His main research interest is ethno-sectarian conflict in the Middle East, particularly Iraq where he has spent two years conducting fieldwork. He has a PhD in Ethnopolitics from the University of Exeter, where his thesis examined the status of Kirkuk within the wider issues of conflict and governance in Iraq.

Dr Róisín Read, Lecturer in Peace and Conflict Studies
Róisín has joined the HCRI in 2014 as part of the Making Peacekeeping Data Work Project which will consider the use and production of UN peacekeeping data in Darfur, continuing her research focus on Sudan and South Sudan and the politics of knowledge production. She is also researching the interactions between northern and southern NGOs in emergency response. Róisín’s research explores the politics of international interventions in conflict situations through an interrogation of language, with a special focus on non-governmental organisations and the Sudans. She completed her ESRC-funded PhD in the Global Development Institute at the University of Manchester in 2013.

Professor Duncan Shaw, Professor of Operations and Critical Systems
Duncan Shaw was appointed Professor of Operations and Critical Systems in 2014. He is Head of the Operations Management Group and has a part-time role in the Manchester University’s Humanitarian and Conflict Research Institute. Prior appointments include Professor at the Warwick and Aston Universities. His research and consulting interests focus on government and citizen response to disasters, looking at these challenges from the perspectives of: organisational structure; operational response; societal resilience; community involvement. He chairs the working group on Community Resilience for the International Standards Organisation (ISO) and wrote the standards on mass evacuation (ISO22315) and disaster volunteers (ISO22319) and contributed to standards on waste management (for IAEA). Duncan has conducted research and sat on policy, planning and evaluation committees for the EC, national governments and international NGOs across 15 countries. He has run projects totalling £6.5m for the EC, ESRC, industry and various government departments.

Dr Gemma Sou, Lecturer in Disaster Management
Gemma is the programme director for HCRI’s undergraduate programme in International Disaster Management & Humanitarian Response. She received a BA in International Relations and Politics at the University of Sheffield (2008), an MA in Urban Planning with specialism in cities of the Global South (2009) at the University of Manchester and a PhD in Development Studies (2014), also here at the University of Manchester. Broadly speaking her research focuses on the experiences of marginalised groups in cities of the Global South and their representation in development discourse. She focuses particularly on multi-scalar approaches to address disaster risk in ‘Southern cities’, the intersection of disaster risk management and broader development processes and how vulnerable groups are embedding disaster risk management into social and cultural norms at the grassroots level.

Dr Birte Vogel, Director of Teaching and Learning
Birte is a Lecturer in Peace and Conflict studies. Her research explores the interplay between international and local actors in peace interventions. She is currently working on the economic local turn in Peace and Conflict Studies and is particularly interested in post-conflict economy formation and cross-communal trade in conflict zones. Birte is Assistant Editor of the Taylor and Francis journal Peacebuilding and has been awarded a major AHRC grant on arts and local peace formation.

Dr Darren Walter, Director of Online Programmes
Darren Walter is the Academic Curriculum Director working within the WHO Collaborating Centre Emergency Medical Teams and Emergency Capacity Building project at HCRI and is also a Consultant in Emergency Medicine at University Hospital of South Manchester. His research interests are focussed on developing emergency care systems, particularly in low and middle-income countries, with a focus on pre-hospital clinical care and disaster medicine.

Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM)

Mrs. Hayoung Lee, Senior Lecturer in Humanitarian Practice (LEAP course director; core module convener)
Hayoung Lee is a global mental health specialist and humanitarian practitioner. Since 2001, she has engaged in providing direct clinical support, technical support and operational research for vulnerable populations exposed to complex emergencies characterized as forced migration (North Korea, Hong Kong and Mongolia), natural disaster (Haiti, Indonesia and Japan), political violence and internal conflict (Sri-Lanka and Nigeria), and epidemic outbreak (Ebola and Zika) through diverse organizations including Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC/Emergency Response and Recovery Branch in Atlanta, USA), and United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR in Beijing, China). In South Korea, she served as a public health advisor for Korean International Development Agency (KOICA), and worked at the Ministry of Unification, and the National Human Rights Commission. She is a certified psychologist in South Korea and holds public health degree from London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK.

Mrs Mary Lyons, Senior Lecturer in Public Health (LEAP SC member; core module convener)
Mary is a public health specialist and from working for many years in low and middle income countries brings a wealth of knowledge and hands-on experience to the development of educational programmes. Mary is a Fellow of the Faculty of Public Health in the UK and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. She works as a senior lecturer in public health at Liverpool School or Tropical Medicine (LSTM), where her roles include director of studies for the MSc in International Public Health and supervision of public health registrars who are training to become public health consultants. As head of environment, sustainability and capacity development at Liverpool John Moores University, Mary worked closely with the Health Protection Agency in the UK and led several research projects. Mary also worked in the NHS as a public health specialist where she led the redesign of local cardiovascular disease services and took responsibility for commissioning, monitoring and quality assurance of screening and immunisation programmes.

Core Academic Staff

Emeritus Professor Barry Munslow
Barry is a top-level policy advisor for governments and regional organisations on sustainable development, environment, land reform, agriculture, energy, public and development management, higher education, health and humanitarian emergencies. He has written numerous books and academic articles on a wide variety of subjects within a political economy framework. He is visiting Research Professor at the Graduate School of Public and Development Management, University of Witwatersrand, South Africa, Visiting Professor at the Centre for Healthcare Planning and Management, University of Keele, UK and Visiting Professor at the Centre for Public Policy and Management, Manchester Business School, UK, teaching on Public Health and Healthcare Management. Barry has been working and writing in recent years on complex political emergencies and teaching on this topic at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine. Currently co-editing a book on Managing the Politics of Delivery in South Africa. He is a member of the editorial boards of Progress in Development Studies and Third World Quarterly.

Dr Tim O’Dempsey, a Senior Lecturer in Clinical Tropical Medicine.
Dr Tim O’Dempsey is a Senior Lecturer in Clinical Tropical Medicine at LSTM with over 35 years’ experience in international health and tropical medicine. He has worked in hospital, community and public health medicine in rural Kenya, Sierra Leone, The Gambia (with the Medical Research Council), and in the development of postgraduate training programmes in Sudan, Ethiopia, Somalia and South Africa. He is particularly interested in training and capacity building in developing countries. He is the principal architect in the design, development and implementation of LSTM’s training programmes in Humanitarian Assistance and is Director of Studies for the Diploma in Humanitarian Assistance, MSc Humanitarian Studies and MSc Humanitarian Health Programme Management. He is also Director of Studies for LSTM’s Diploma in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. He has worked as a Consultant for the World Health Organisation (IMAI, IMCI, ARI, Malaria, Malaria in Complex Emergencies), Department of Foreign Affairs, Ireland (Health Programmes and Operational Research, Ethiopia), and Concern Worldwide (Global Health Strategy). From July 2014 to December 2015 he was on secondment from LSTM to WHO as Clinical Lead for the Ebola response in Sierra Leone. His clinical and research interests include clinical tropical medicine, ARI and malaria in children; health issues among refugees and asylum seekers; health education in developing countries, infectious disease and global climate change.

Dr. Martha Judith Chinouya, Senior Lecturer in Global Health
Dr. Martha Judith Chinouya (FHEA) is based at Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Education Department. Martha is a Senior Lecturer (Global Health) and the current Director of the MSc Global Health Programme. She is involved in curriculum design and delivery of various modules within the Department. Before joining LSTM, Martha worked as the Director of the MPH studies at the University of Liverpool, London campus.   She also conducts research and her interests interrogate the interactions between global health, human rights, migration, identities, and medicines. She has led, as Principal Investigator, several research projects with refugees, asylum seekers etc. Martha has published widely and some of her publications explores gendered violence in Africa: Chinouya, M. (2013): Ethnic identities and gendered violence in sub-Saharan Africa: a commentary. Ethnicity & Health, DOI:10.1080/13557858.2013.799361. She has also co-authored a book: Aspinall and Chinouya (2016) African diaspora in Britain book: http://www.palgrave.com/us/book/9781137456533

Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF)

Dr. Marion Péchayre, MSF-CRASH (LEAP SC member)
Dr. Marion Pechayre is an anthropologist specialised in international relief issues. Her previous practical experience includes management responsibilities both in the field and at the head office of Solidarités International. She holds a PhD in Development Studies (SOAS) and an MA in Conflict, Security and Development (King’s College London) and an MA in International Management (ESCP Europe). She has taught at the School of Oriental and African Studies, and at the Paris School of International Affairs (Sciences Po).